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  • May 11, 2021 5:37 AM | Anonymous


    The Inevitable Impact of the Pandemic on Children’s Mental Health

    May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Yet, the rippling effect of the pandemic on mental health is ongoing and will be likely felt by children for years. The gravity of the impact on the wellbeing of children underscores the collective need of advocates to be informed, engaged and empowered.

    Trauma, also known to practitioners as adverse childhood experiences (ACE), may well include the adverse experiences to the pandemic, namely the “deaths, illness, economic and housing instability, and loss of daily school routine.” Source: Children’s Mental Health Crisis Could Be a Next ‘Wave’ in the Pandemic | Health News | US News

    Furthermore, as the cause of trauma is multi-faceted, so is the response. The pandemic certainly has required significant pivots in mental health treatment delivery in the absence of face to face contact. While telemedicine is a viable option, it too has accentuated disparities between those with access to broadband and technology and those without.

    In fact, during the 2021 Legislative Session, ICM was one of many organizations that supported efforts to ensure the state budget addressed the need for expansive and statewide broadband. Additionally, ICM tracked and highlighted legislation aimed at streamlining Medicaid eligibility for children and providing easier access to telemedicine. Both measures were recently signed into law by Governor Kemp.

    There is much more work to be done, as well as an urgent need to understand the nuisances of trauma to guide the work of advocates and help to prioritize mobilization efforts. So join ICM in upcoming and important trainings aligned with the mission to advocate for the wellbeing of children in Georgia.



    NEXT ICM MEMBER MEETING: Thursday, May 20, 2021, 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Your Engagement is Vital to ICM’s Mission

    WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

    Join us on Thursday, May, 20 2021, 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM, for ICM’s General Membership Meeting. As collective advocates on behalf of children, this is an opportunity to hear updates, discuss ideas, ask questions, and share suggestions.

    Come hear about:

    • Growing the Movement Campaign
    • Statewide Initiative
    • Launch of the Youth Alliance Academy for Social Justice
    • Upcoming Trainings and Learning Opportunities
    • What You Can Do Now
    • Join the Movement

    JOIN AS A MEMBER 

    REGISTER FOR MEMBER MEETING

    Member meetings are free for members and first-time joiners. To get your registration code to join your first meeting for free, just subscribe to our newsletter and you will automatically receive your free code to join.


    The Trauma of Poverty

    Approximately 500,000 children in Georgia live in families with income below the poverty line, which according to federal guidelines is the equivalent of about $26,000 for a family of four. As troubling, the Children’s Defense Fund finds about 217,000 children live in “extreme poverty”, which is less than half of the poverty line. Source: https://www.ajc.com/ajcjobs/major-aid-for-families-in-rescue-act-could-slash-georgia-poverty-rate/PQ7KHQP2KVDSDPJJA34VA2GPHQ/#:~:text=Roughly%20217%2C000%20children%20in%20Georgia,to%20the%20Childrens'%20Defense%20Fund.

    Join ICM on Wednesday, May 19, 6:00 PM-7:00 PM, for an important presentation by Prevent Child Abuse Georgia: If Not Me Then Who? Poverty-Informed Training.

    Have you ever taken a class on poverty? Growing up in poverty has life-long consequences for a child’s physical and mental health and economic well-being. Using first-hand stories and perspectives, participants will learn the facts, underlying myths, expand their perceptions, and be able to enact tangible strategies to uplift our community’s vulnerable populations. 

    Registration Here: https://icmgeorgia.wildapricot.org/event-4262975


    Training Opportunity for Students

    Did you know the 2018-2019 Georgia Student Health Survey (GSHS) (gadoe.org) of 6th through 12th-grade students revealed 11% (77,881) have seriously considered attempting suicide, and 6% (37,508 students) have attempted suicide?

    Join ICM on Thursday, May 27, 6:00 PM-7:00 PM, as the National Alliance on Mental Illness presents: Ending the Silence for Students.

    This presentation designed for middle and high school students includes warning signs, facts and statistics, and how to get help for themselves or a friend. 

    Register Here:

    https://icmgeorgia.wildapricot.org/event-4262971


    Your Input in Needed

    Help Advocate for Equity in Education

    ICM is part of Fund Georgia's Future, a coalition that works to create a just public educational system with fair and full funding, and wants to learn more about the state's K-12 public school funding system. You can help by sharing your perspective and experiences with public schools, whether it's as a student, parent, educator or community member. Your responses to the survey below is greatly appreciated. 

    Access survey here: http://bit.ly/FGFSurvey



  • April 26, 2021 6:37 PM | Anonymous


    Childhood poverty demands ongoing advocacy

    Yes, the 2021 legislative session is over, but not the work on behalf of children. Advocacy is ongoing and a continuum towards change. Children cannot afford silence or delay.

    An NBC article glaringly titled “Poverty soared to a pandemic high”, notes poverty disproportionately affects the most marginalized populations, including children. The impact of the pandemic and resulting economic uncertainties has caused childhood poverty to soar to a rate of 17.4 percent.

    As telling, the article addresses the correlation between stimulus payments and drops in poverty, while also emphasizing concern of what happens when the safety net afforded by the CARES ACT gradually comes to an end. Moreover, economic recovery will not be the same for everyone, but in all instances children will be impacted.

    Advocacy demands we stay engaged by learning, sharing and acting on the issue of childhood poverty and other issues shaping the lives of children. We must also be strategic in our mobilization efforts recognizing the combined voices of a few is not as loud as the ROAR of many. Join the ROAR!

    Article: https://www.nbcnews.com/business/business-news/poverty-soared-pandemic-high-last-month-n1264692


  • April 02, 2021 2:44 PM | Anonymous


    The end of the 2021 legislative session was marked by Sine Die on March 31, the final date for a bill to be passed by both chambers before being sent to the Governor’s desk. The Governor has 40 days to act upon receipt of a bill. The Governor can either sign the bill into law, veto the bill, or do nothing, which would allow the bill to automatically become law at the end of the 40 days.


    Photo Attribution: Ken Lund 2011, Flickr

     Below are bills that ICM tracked and are now before the Governor.

    • Senate Bill 33 -provides a cause of action against perpetrators for victims of human trafficking.
    • Senate Bill 34 -provides that victims of human trafficking may petition for name change under seal.
    • Senate Bill 42-revised bill strikes out much of the original language removing consideration of data regarding student discipline in public schools from school climate determinations and incorporates provisions for disclosure of discipline data.
    • Senate Bill 107- waives tuition and all fees for qualifying foster and adopted students by units of the University System of Georgia and the Technical College System of Georgia.
    • House Bill 163-Express Lane Eligibility Bill, allows the state to use data from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program to identify and enroll uninsured children who are already eligible for Medicaid.
    • House Bill 307-Georgia Telehealth Act, expands existing law to make it easier for health care providers to offer telemedicine services from home including by telephone and to allow patients to receive care at their home, workplace, or school. Insurers could not require that specific platforms to be used to deliver care or set separate deductibles for telemedicine services.

    The legislative session is also a reminder that advocacy is a constant and demands fortitude and commitment on behalf of children. This is illustrated by bills ICM tracked, but they did not cross over or failed to get a vote on the floor. However, these bills could be considered in 2022.

    • House Resolution 52, creates the Joint Study Committee on Childhood Lead Exposure and would make recommendations for early intervention and prevention strategies for childhood lead exposure.
    • House Bill 72-New Mothers Medicaid Expansion Act, extends pregnancy Medicaid for women up one year postpartum.
    • House Bill 120- Georgia Resident In-State Tuition Act, allows DACA students to qualify for in-state tuition for the University System of Georgia and the Technical College System of Georgia.
    • House Bill 272-Raise the Age Bill, expands Juvenile Court jurisdiction to include 17-year-olds who have not committed serious crimes.

    We must stay the course and continue the work on behalf of children on these and other issues impacting their well-being. Specifically, ICM has a long-standing history of advocating for Juvenile Justice and has supported efforts to Raise the Age over the years. Although House Bill 272 failed to reach the Senate floor for a vote, its movement through the legislature this year is by far the most progress it has made to date and the closest to becoming law.

    ICM extends gratitude and appreciation to all partners, supporters, and advocates for supporting children this legislative session. However, our work endures, and we will continue to rally to make sure voices ROAR on behalf of all children in Georgia.

    What can you do?

    • Stay engaged.
    • Learn about issues impacting the well-being of children.
    • Share information throughout your networks.
    • Get to know your legislators now in preparation for the 2022 legislative session.
    • Stay connected with ICM and participate in training opportunities and advocacy forums.


  • March 03, 2021 6:18 AM | Anonymous
    Find Your Legislator

    The Georgia Legislature has scheduled Crossover Day on Monday, March 8, and Sine Die on Wednesday, March 31

    Crossover day is the last day that a bill can be passed in the Senate and sent to the House or passed in the House and sent to the Senate. Bills that fail to get a floor vote by Crossover Day generally would not be passed this year. Sine Die is the final date for a bill to be passed by both chambers before being sent to the governor’s desk for approval or veto.


    Here are updates of bills that ICM is tracking:


    House Bill 272-Raise the Age Bill, would expand Juvenile Court jurisdiction to include 17-year-olds who have not committed serious crimes.

    NOTE: Raise the Age bill is stuck in the rules committee... If it doesn't get a vote by MONDAY, it will get tabled and sat aside once again.

    This bill is still in the House. CONTACT YOUR REPRESENTATIVE TO BRING HB 272 TO THE HOUSE FLOOR FOR A VOTE BY THE FULL HOUSE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

    House Bill 72-New Mothers Medicaid Expansion Act, would extend pregnancy Medicaid for women up one year postpartum.

    This bill is still in the House. CONTACT YOUR REPRESENTATIVE TO BRING HB 72 TO THE HOUSE FLOOR FOR A VOTE BY THE FULL HOUSE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. 

    Senate Bill 33-would provide a cause of action against perpetrators for victims of human trafficking.

    This bill was passed in the Senate and is now in the House. CONTACT YOUR REPRESENTATIVE TO BRING SB 33 TO THE HOUSE FLOOR FOR A VOTE BY THE FULL HOUSE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

    Senate Bill 34-would provide that victims of human trafficking may petition for name change under seal.

    This bill was passed in the Senate and is now in the House. CONTACT YOUR REPRESENTATIVE TO BRING SB 34 TO THE HOUSE FLOOR FOR A VOTE BY THE FULL HOUSE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

    House Bill 163-Medicaid Express Lane Eligibility Bill, would allow the state to use data from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program to identify and enroll uninsured children who are already eligible for Medicaid. 
    This bill was passed in the House and is now in the Senate. CONTACT YOUR SENATOR TO BRING HB 163 TO THE SENATE FLOOR FOR A VOTE BY THE FULL SENATE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

    House Bill 120- Georgia Resident In-State Tuition Act, would allow DACA students to qualify for in-state tuition for the University System of Georgia and the Technical College System of Georgia.

    This bill is still in the House. CONTACT YOUR REPRESENTATIVE TO BRING HB 120 TO THE HOUSE FLOOR FOR A VOTE BY THE FULL HOUSE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

    House Bill 307-Georgia Telehealth Act, expands existing law to make it easier for health care providers to offer telemedicine services from home including by telephone and to allow patients to receive care at their home, workplace, or school. Insurers could not require that specific platforms to be used to deliver care or set separate deductibles for telemedicine services.

    This bill has passed the House and is now in the Senate. CONTACT YOUR SENATOR TO BRING HB 307 TO THE SENATE FLOOR FOR A VOTE BY THE FULL SENATE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

    Your Action Is Needed Now!

    • Take a few minutes and make a difference for children.

    • You can find your legislators here.

    • Share this information and call to action throughout your networks.

    • Every voice matters and collectively we will ROAR for children.


  • February 21, 2021 1:30 PM | Anonymous
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    Treat Kids Like kids

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    ICM is one of many advocacy organizations that have long supported efforts to expand Juvenile Court jurisdiction to include 17-year-olds who have not committed serious crimes. The newest iteration of the “Raise the Age” bill, HB 272, is currently pending in the House Juvenile Justice Committee.

    Georgia is one of only three states, along with Texas and Wisconsin, that automatically prosecutes 17-year-olds as adults for all crimes. Yet, data shows that brain functions regulating decision making, planning, judgment, and impulse control are not fully developed until the mid-20’s. Thus, brain development of a 17-year-old significantly differs from an adult. Voices for Georgia's Children provides additional data worthy of consideration.

    Moreover, Juvenile Court, and not the adult prison system, is better equipped to respond to the needs of children who commit nonviolent crimes. The Juvenile Court affords mandatory school attendance, restitution to victims, and participation in rehabilitative programs. These measures are aligned with treating kids as kids.

    Referencing her ongoing work on “Raising the Age”, Representative Mary Margaret Oliver emphasizes the need for constituents to participate in the legislative process and voice their concerns.

    "Stepping into Advocacy" Orientation - YouTube Insert portion of this video starting at 29:43 and ending at 31:41

    WHAT CAN YOU DO?

    ·         Take a few minutes and make a difference for children.

    ·         This is the opportunity to call or email members of the House Juvenile Justice Committee and ask that they support HB 272, ensuring treatment of kids as kids.

    ·         You can find contact information for members of the House Juvenile Justice Committee here.     

    ·         Share this information and call to action throughout your networks.

    Every voice matters and collectively we will ROAR for children. 

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    House Bill 120: Support tuition equity by extending in-state tuition to DACA recipients.

    Undocumented students pay tuition rates far exceeding those of other students.



    According to data from the Georgia Budget & Policy Institute (GBPI), Georgia is home to 20,900 DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipients, ranking eighth in the nation for the largest population of active DACA recipients. There are also 44,000 DACA-eligible people living in Georgia. Yet, Georgia is 1 of 3 states, along with South Carolina and Alabama, that bar undocumented students from enrolling in certain colleges.

    DACA recipients living in Georgia may also struggle to afford postsecondary education because they are forced to pay out-of-state tuition rates. GBPI reveals undocumented students pay tuition rates that are nearly three times that of other students in the university system and four times that of their classmates in technical colleges.

    Current legislation HB 120 would allow DACA students to qualify for in-state tuition for the University System of Georgia and the Technical College System of Georgia. HB 120 is currently pending in the House Higher Education Committee.

    Increasing access to higher education by extending in-state tuition to DACA recipients would benefit Georgia by fostering stable and thriving communities.

    WHAT CAN YOU DO?

    ·         Take a few minutes and make a difference for children.

    ·         This is the opportunity to call or email members of the House Higher Education Committee and ask that they support HB 120, ensuring tuition equity for DACA recipients.  

    ·         You can find contact information for members of the House Higher Education Committee here.

    ·         Share this information and call to action throughout your networks.

    Every voice matters and collectively we will ROAR for children.

    THIS WEEK’S UNSUNG HERO

    Saluting Everyday Heroes Who Have Hearts for Children...

    A presentation about the anguish of teens who are bought and sold for sex with men broke hearts at Ahavath Achim Synagogue.

    Seven years ago, Linda Bressler, Steve Chervin and Margie Eden attended a talk about children in Atlanta who are forced to endure sexual encounters with men.  Child Sex Trafficking. The presentation at their synagogue, Ahavath Achim in Buckhead, left them horrified. Heartbroken. And they knew they had to mobilize the community to action. 

    So they organized the AAACTS Committee (Awareness and Action to Abolish Child Trafficking for Sex). 

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    The goal:  To create awareness within Ahavath Achim (AA),  the Atlanta - wide Jewish community, and Atlanta’s interfaith community about the issue of Child Sex Trafficking. They were eager partners with other groups advocating to change the laws about commercial sex exploitation of teenagers.

    Linda, Steve and Margie organized others. There were hundreds of hours of educating and mobilizing.    Finally, in 2015, a new law, “Safe Harbor/Rachel’s Law” became Georgia law. The new law treats children victimized by sex trafficking as victims—not criminals. It provides money to treat their trauma, and raises the penalties for men who buy children for sex as well as the pimps who sell them.

    The work of AAACTS continued.  In preparation for the 2019 Superbowl in Atlanta, the group organized 200+ volunteers to wrap and deliver 60,000 bars of specially labeled soap to hotels and motels all around Atlanta. If a person visiting the rooms there was being trafficked, the bars contained the number for the trafficking hotline.  

    Linda Bressler and Margie Eden continue to lead AAACTS education and advocacy efforts… and many many vulnerable children thank them for it.    

    Viva AAACTS! You are truly Behind the Scenes “Unsung Heroes for Children!”

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    Linda Bressler on the left, Margie Eden on the right.


    Linda Bressler on the left, Margie Eden on the right.











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    Recommend a friend for recognition as an “Unsung Hero for Children

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    Tell us about a friend who’s a big-hearted hero for children.

    February is Hearts for Children Month.  It’s time to sing the praises of a friend. Recommend them for Unsung Hero recognition.
    Send a picture! ICM will post them all during the month of February in all our digital platforms! (Remember “unsung” is the key!)

    You know them… devoted teachers, mentors, workers with and for children, visionaries with big ideas and big hearts for the welfare of children. They are the unsung heroes for children. Unsung. Their gifts of love for children often continue for years without praise. 



    February, however, is the perfect month to sing their praises.  Let’s make them blush!

    Send a picture! ICM will post them all during the month of February in all our digital platforms! (Remember “unsung” is the key!)

    Here are the categories: 

    Didn't Quit, Behind the Scenes, Most Inspirational, Beloved by Children, Intrepid Leader.

    Click here to recommend the person you admire. You’ll be glad you took 15 minutes to share their story with the world.


  • February 02, 2021 8:12 AM | Anonymous

    Let’s ROAR together to protect children, victims of human trafficking, and disparate communities in the state by supporting SB33, SB34, HB177, and HB178, and by contacting your legislator and asking them to prioritize Georgia’s children by passing a budget reflective of the whole child!


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    Protecting Children and Victims of Human Trafficking

    SB33, SB34, HB177, HB 178 are a step in the right direction.

    January marked Human Trafficking Awareness Month. However, reality reminds us that human trafficking is an everyday and yearlong problem. Last year alone, the FBI initiated 664 human trafficking investigations nationwide, resulting in the arrests of 473 traffickers.

    HAPPENING IN FULTON: LEGISLATIVE UPDATE HUMAN TRAFFICKING provides an excellent overview of the legislative recommendations from the Georgians for Refuge, Action, Compassion, and Education (GRACE) Commission. These recommendations include: 1) name change privacy for survivors of human trafficking, 2) survivors of human trafficking would be allowed to pursue civil damages against their traffickers, and 3) persons seeking commercial driver licenses or renewals must undergo required human trafficking awareness training. 


    Relating to these recommendations are four bills before the current legislature. Senate Bill 34 and House Bill 178 would provide that victims of human trafficking may petition for name change under seal. Senate Bill 33 and House Bill 177 would provide a cause of action against perpetrators for victims of human trafficking.

    Deborah J. Richardson, Executive Director of International Human Trafficking Institute, shared: 

    "Due to the hard work, of many, including the Interfaith Children's Movement, Georgia has a good track record of passing important legislation to support victims and hold predators and traffickers accountable. The current bills for consideration in this session are important ones, and we need to urge our elected officials to support them."

    WHAT CAN YOU DO?

    A few minutes of your time can make a difference. It takes minutes to share this important information throughout your network and to call or email your legislators. You can find your legislators here.Tell them to support legislation SB33, SB34, HB177, and HB178 protecting children and victims of human trafficking.

    FIND YOUR LEGISLATOR

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    What Happens To Those Children Without Wifi During Virtual Learning?
    About 1.6 million Georgians do not have access to high-speed internet.

    As with most of last year and through this year, the Covid-19 pandemic continues to have a profound impact, more so on our children. The pandemic has highlighted significant issues worthy of legislative consideration and budgetary action.   

    A direct consequence of the pandemic is the transitioning of an in-person learning model to virtual. However, virtual learning is problematic for children who do not have access to broadband and the educational divide is heightened without internet access. About 1.6 million Georgians do not have access to high-speed internet, and in Georgia school systems with fewer than 1,000 students, 56% of households do not have high speed internet available (Source: With Georgia Classrooms Closed for the School Year, Digital Divide Emerges). It is incumbent on the legislature to recognize the need for affordable and quality high-speed internet access as a basic utility for all Georgia families. 

    The pandemic accentuates the need for healthcare and the readily available access of internet in rural communities and for disparate minority groups. In support of protecting the Affordable Care Act and expansion of Medicaid, Georgians for a Healthy Future notes “these groups are already shouldering the heaviest burden of the pandemic and face unfair barriers to care.” Likewise, the Georgia Budget & Policy Institute states over 470,000 Georgians would be able to see a health provider and not worry about facing medical debt if the state expanded Medicaid. Specific to children, Data from the Anne E. Casey Foundation shows in the fall of 2020, one in eight households with children lacked health insurance. Healthcare is vital to the wellbeing of all children. 

    The economic uncertainties of unemployment and struggles with maintaining housing as consequences of the pandemic are additional burdens for families. Yet, data from the Georgia Budget & Policy Institute indicates there is a correlation between the proportion of black families living in a state and access to direct cash assistance. Notably, the higher the proportion of black families living in a state, the more likely policymakers are to spend less on direct cash assistance and establish policies to control the way families in poverty run their lives, rather than simply giving them the direct aid necessary to meet basic needs. Georgia has the third largest Black population in the nation and in 2019, nearly 1.3 million Georgians lived below the poverty line, with one in five kids in poverty. Safety nets for the vulnerable must be protected and equitable.

    WHAT CAN YOU DO? Contact your legislators and ask them where they stand on these and other child-focused issues. Tell your legislator to support legislation that prioritize Georgia’s children and pass a budget reflective of the whole child. If you do not know who your legislators are? Click here: https://openstates.org/find_your_legislator/

    FIND YOUR LEGISLATOR

    Saluting Everyday Heroes Who Have Hearts for Children...

    Presenting:  Dr. Qiana Johnson, the first Unsung Hero for February, Hearts for Children Month


    Dr. Qiana Johnson has a beautiful heart for children.  William Abdul-Khaaliq saw that in his friend and recommended her for an Unsung Hero award.  This is just the first Hero you’ll meet during February!

    Please, please, please!  Recommend your own hero.  Be sure to do it in February, the month of hearts….

    Dr.Johnson was recommended for the category:  Behind the Scenes

    Why??? : “Dr. Qiana Johnson is a medical care provider who gives kind, tender, focused care. She is especially good to foster children that come into her clinic for physical exams. Many of these children have been separated from their families and have suffered unimaginable physical and/or emotional harm. 

            “They come to Dr. Johnson's Lotus Family Wellness Clinic traumatized, afraid and mistrusting. She takes extra time to listen, really listen to them. That is one of the first things she does. She kindly explains every step of the exam and any healing plans, giving them a sense of ownership over their bodies. She is honest and direct and down to earth as she educates them and the foster parent. 

           “She shows genuine care and love and finds lots of reasons to laugh with them. Laughter is the best medicine she gives to these children living with trauma. The children seem more at ease and happy in her care. Dr. Johnson is good to all of her patients, but she is especially caring to the foster children.” 


    Nominate the Community’s Unsung Heroes


    Tell us about your big-hearted hero’s loving acts for children. Send a picture! ICM will post them all during the month of February in all our digital platforms! (Remember “unsung” is the key!) You know them… devoted teachers, mentors, workers with and for children, visionaries with big ideas and big hearts for the welfare of children. They are the unsung heroes for children. Unsung. Their gifts of love for children often continue for years without praise.  

    February, however, is the perfect month to sing their praises.  Let’s make them blush!

    Here are the categories: 

    Didn't Quit, Behind the Scenes, Most Inspirational, Beloved by Children, Intrepid Leader.




  • January 19, 2021 8:14 AM | Anonymous


    The 2021 Georgia legislative session is set to begin on January 11. This is also a time to LEARN of issues worthy of legislative action. In upcoming events, ICM’s partners and other advocacy organizations will afford the opportunity to learn of legislative priorities.

    CATHY HARMON-CHRISTIAN, REFLECTS ON
    DR MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR, DAY.
    ICM BOARD MEMBER AND CHAIR OF THE ADVOCACY COMMITTEE, SPEAKS HER TRUTH.

    It is Dr Martin Luther King, Jr, day as I write this. I have put it off until now because as a white woman, I am filled with the question: should I be writing this, should my voice be in any way amplified, as a white woman? What can I say that couldn’t be said better by so many Black women and women of color who have lived the reality of racism due to white supremacist violence to the point of intergenerational trauma? Won’t my words ring hollow on this hallowed ground of Dr Martin Luther King? Will they offend?

    And as I sit in prayer, in the silence where the Holy meets me, the word that comes to me is this: speak your truth. And so I will.

    As a white woman, I choose to be in solidarity with all Black people, with indigenous people, with all those that white supremacy has sought to oppress or belittle or dehumanize.

    As a white woman I say no and I do not go along with the lie that to be white is to be better than.

    As a white woman, I lament the history of racism and white supremacy in this country that lives in its bones and breathes out its acrid, toxic breath upon all who breathe.


    As a white woman, I stand on the side of justice, of fairness, of doing the work it takes to learn the true history of this country, of its whiteness, which ends in racist structures, practices, and principles that so many, too many, white people deny.

    As a white woman, I choose to be silent and listen to Black people - to hear their truth, their pain, their wisdom, their lessons of resiliency that are so strong, so capable, so powerful.

    As a white woman, I do have power to change what is and I claim my voice, my vote, my strength of character to do what I can, every day, in this “fierce urgency of now.”

    I will advocate for the end of white supremacy, and it’s effluent, racism, so that all God’s children will know justice and peace.

    May the faith of our inter-faith communities be deep, abiding, and united in justice and peace.

    May the God we worship be the one of the peace-maker, nonviolent resistance, and love, not the one of empire, violence, and brutality.

    May our children, our beloved children, see us leading the way together, for their wellbeing.

     

    By Cathy Harmon-Christian



  • September 01, 2020 7:23 AM | Anonymous

    WHY JOIN ICM

    “ICM Is Doing Joyous Work,” Says Scotty Greene In This 3 Minute Video. 

    “ICM allows me to bring my faith and engage it in action to improve the lives of our citizens who are the least able to help themselves… our children.”


    “As an ICM advocate I interact with people of many faiths. We raise our voices together, and we act together.  Working and worshiping with people of other faiths enriches my own faith,” Scotty says.

    ‘We PRAY together.  We LEARN together.  We ACT together.

    “I hope you will join us. Bring your faith. Bring your prayer. Raise your voice with us,” he says.

    “Volunteer your time.  Share your resources.  Join  this movement to improve the lives of our children.”


  • May 04, 2020 9:56 AM | Anonymous

    Suddenly, there was a storm… 

    As 2020 dawned, life in our part of the world felt “normal.”  And then coronavirus started a rampage across the entire planet. Through these difficult times, ICM asked, where can we find strength in the storm?

    We let ICM’s motto “PRAY. LEARN. ACT.” guide us.

    During spring and early summer 2020, ICM shared short videos of prayers and info sessions delivered by faith leaders from all around Georgia’s interfaith community. Scroll down below to hear what our community’s child advocacy leaders had to say.

    June 29, 2020

    Michael Waller of Georgia Appleseed on the School to Prison Pipeline

    Read article



    June 22, 2020

    Dr. Erica Fener Sitkoff Says "Crisis Magnifies What Already Exists": Our Legislature Must Hear YOUR Voice

    Read article


    June 15, 2020

    “What About Dad?”: Kenneth Braswell on How Uplifting Fathers Empowers Child Advocacy

    Read article


    June 8, 2020

    Julia Day Neighbors of Prevent Child Abuse (PCA) Georgia speaks on Child Abuse: Childhood Trauma Affects Brain Development and Can Cause Long Term Health Problems

    Read article


    June 2, 2020

    Eye-Opening Facts on Domestic Violence: Cassandra Velasco Adams Speaks About Domestic Violence

    Read article


    May 26, 2020

    Covid-19 and Child Exploitation: A Recipe for Disaster... Deborah Richardson Speaks About Child Exploitation

    Read article



    May 19, 2020

    In a Sudden, Brutal Storm, How Do We Find Strength?: Let’s LEARN Together and Raise Awareness on Child Advocacy During Covid-19.

    Read article


    May 11, 2020

    Child Sex Trafficking and Child Pornography Worsens during Covid-19: Your prayers are needed on this important issue now more than ever.

    Read article


    May 4, 2020

    Father Desmond Drummer of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta prays with a highlight on “Youth Incarceration”

    Read article


    April 27, 2020

    Abdul-Raheem Hasan, Teacher, Coach, and Imam prays with a highlight on “Educational Inequality”

    Read article




    April 20, 2020

    Atlanta native Basheer Jones, the first Muslim Cleveland city councilman in Cleveland Ohio, prays with a highlight on “Childhood Hunger”

    Read article



    April 13, 2020

    Kit Cummings, Minister, Author and Motivational Speaker prays with a highlight on “Domestic Violence”

    Read article


  • May 20, 2019 2:17 PM | Anonymous


    The ICM Board of Directors is excited to announce that Tara Hall, an experienced executive director of non-profits, has been appointed Executive Director of the Interfaith Children’s Movement. 


    With experience directly serving traumatized children and women, Ms. Hall said:

    “I’m ready to work in the ‘advocacy’ dimension.  I know deep down in my soul about the trauma that shuts down life possibilities for children.  I have seen it one-on-one for many years. Now I want to promote advocacy.  The goal of advocacy is make good public policy so that children do not experience the trauma that steals the magical gifts every child is born with. People of faith… and worship communities…. when they work together… have a powerful voice for children. I’m passionate about helping them use it." 

    Tara Hall's leadership at ICM began May 6, 2019.

    Please plan to meet Tara  (and sign up for a volunteer role… and become a member) over the next few months.


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